Apple Rootstock Info: V.1

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock V.1

The Vineland series of apple rootstocks originated as open-pollinated hybrids of ‘Kerr’ crabapples and M.9 rootstock and were selected at the Horticultural Experiment Station at Vineland, Ontario, Canada in 1958. According to information from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, V.1 is in the M.26 size class, and yield and yield efficiency are usually greater than M.26. V.1 is cold hardy and somewhat resistant to fireblight. V.1 was included in the 1994

Apple Rootstock Info: G.935

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock G.935

G.935 is a 1976 cross of Ottawa 3 and Robusta 5. Size is reported to be slightly larger than M.26, but the rootstock has resistance to fire blight and crown rot. It is not resistant to woolly apple aphid. Production efficiency is rated equal to M.9. In the Golden Delicious trial at Rock Springs in 2006, tree size was about 9 percent larger than M.9 and 12 percent smaller than M.26. Production efficiency was not

Apple Rootstock Info: G.11

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock G.11

Resulted from a cross of M.26 and Robusta 5 crabapple and introduced in 1993 by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY. G.11 is one of the more vigorous dwarfing rootstocks and produces a tree similar in size to M.26. It is precocious (similar to M.26), moderately resistant to fire blight, moderately susceptible to woolly apple aphid and crown an root rots, and requires trunk support, especially in the early years. It produces

Apple Rootstock Info: G.214

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock G.214 Geneva 214 (G.214) is a cross of Robusta 5 x Ottawa 3 and tested as CG.4214. Trees on this rootstock will need to be supported and produce a tree about 30-35% size of seedling with vigor and precocity similar to M.9 Nic.29 and M.26. Trees are more productive than those rootstocks and have good cold hardiness, and are resistant to fire blight, Phytophthora root rot and wooly apple aphid. Source: https://extension.psu.edu/apple-rootstocks-capabilities-and-limitations
Synonyms Geneva 214
Origin

How New Apple Rootstocks Are Developed

Breeding improved apple rootstocks has been a priority research area in New York State since Dr. Jim Cummins and Dr. Herb Aldwinkle initiated crosses in 1970. In 1998, the rootstock program became a joint Cornell/U.S. Department of Agriculture program and in 2011 is headed by Dr. Gennaro Fazio. The program has focused on creating rootstocks that are resistant to the major apple diseases, fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) and crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum), and tolerant to a …