Apple Rootstock Info: G.210

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock G.210

G.210 is a semidwarfing rootstock that is resistant to fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) and crown rot (Phytopthora spp.). It is a hybrid from a cross between  and is larger than Ottawa 3 but smaller than Robusta 5. It is similar in size to Malling 7 but more productive and precocious.

Synonyms Geneva 210
Origin Ottawa 3 and Robusta 5
Availability Trial
Tree Size 60-65%
Precocity Early
Winter Hardiness Hardy
Suckering Low
Tree Support Needed Yes

Apple Rootstock Info: G.16

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock G.16

Resulted from a cross between Ottawa 3 and Malus floribunda and introduced by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY.  G.16 is a dwarfing rootstock and produces a tree similar in size to M.9. It is very precocious and has productivity similar to M.9, and requires full tree support. It is highly resistant to fire blight, quite resistant to crown and root rots, but susceptible to woolly apple aphid. G.16 is hypersensitive to

Apple Rootstock Info: G.30

Characteristic Detail            Description
Rootstock G.30

Resulted from a cross between M.9 and Robusta 5 and introduced by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY.  G.30 produces a fairly vigorous dwarf tree, similar in size to M.26. Precocity and productivity are also similar to M.26. G.30 is highly resistant to fireblight and quite resistant to crown and root rots, but susceptible to woolly apple aphid. G.30 was tested at 20 locations in the NC-140 1994 semi-dwarf rootstock trial with

Apple Rootstock Info: G.969

Characteristic Detail            Description
Rootstock G.969

G.969 is a semidwarfing rootstock that is resistant to fire blight, crown rot, and woolly apple aphid. It is classified as having growth control between M.7 and MM.106. The rootstocks produce few root suckers or burr knots. Suggested for trial for growers desiring a freestanding tree.

Synonyms Geneva 969
Origin N/A
Availability Limited availability
Tree Size 70-75%
Precocity Intermediate
Winter Hardiness Hardy
Suckering N/A
Tree Support Needed No
Where tested within NC-140 or other research

How New Apple Rootstocks Are Developed

Breeding improved apple rootstocks has been a priority research area in New York State since Dr. Jim Cummins and Dr. Herb Aldwinkle initiated crosses in 1970. In 1998, the rootstock program became a joint Cornell/U.S. Department of Agriculture program and in 2011 is headed by Dr. Gennaro Fazio. The program has focused on creating rootstocks that are resistant to the major apple diseases, fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) and crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum), and tolerant to a …