M.27,M.9 interstem MM.111 rootstock

Characteristic Detail            Description
Rootstock M.27,M.9 interstem MM.111 rootstock

Because many dwarfing rootstocks have less than the desired level of cold resistance and trees on all dwarfing rootstocks require support, dwarf rootstocks are sometimes used as interstems to combine the desirable characteristics of a vigorous understock and the dwarfing interstem. Interstem trees consist of three parts: a dwarfing rootstock (usually M.9 or M.27) is used as the interstem and is grafted onto a vigorous rootstock (usually MM.111 or MM.106) and the

M.27, M.9 interstem with MM.106 rootstock

Characteristic Detail            Description
Rootstock M.27, M.9 interstem with MM.106 rootstock

Because many dwarfing rootstocks have less than the desired level of cold resistance and trees on all dwarfing rootstocks require support, dwarf rootstocks are sometimes used as interstems to combine the desirable characteristics of a vigorous understock and the dwarfing interstem. Interstem trees consist of three parts: a dwarfing rootstock (usually M.9 or M.27) is used as the interstem and is grafted onto a vigorous rootstock (usually MM.111 or MM.106)

Apple Rootstock Info: B.118

Characteristic Detail Description
Rootstock B.118

Formerly Bud. 54-118. A semi-dwarfing rootstock from the Michurinsk College of Agriculture, former Soviet Union. Resulted from a’ Moscow Pear’ x M.9 or M.8 cross. Bud. 118 is reported to be a very cold hardy semi-dwarf rootstock and produces a tree about 85% of seedling. It is more precocious than seedling and can be grown without support. It is moderately resistant to fire blight, crown rot. There is very limited experience with Bud.118 in North

Apple Rootstocks: Understanding and Choosing the Right Rootstock

Controlling Apple Tree Size by Horticultural Means


Rootstock

The use of dwarfing rootstocks is the primary means utilized to affect tree size. Apples are the fruit crop that most commonly utilizes dwarfing rootstock. Size range from the very dwarfing rootstocks such as M.27 and P.16 to nearly standard size rootstocks such as MM.111 and MM.106. In pears there is not nearly the range in size controlling rootstocks the majority of which are only +/- 20% the size of seedling. Recently dwarfing rootstocks for cherries have been introduced

Apple Rootstock Characteristics and Descriptions

Click on a rootstock to access characteristics and descriptions.

Dwarfing Rootstocks Semi-Dwarfing Rootstocks Standard Size Rootstocks
B.9 B.118 Antonovka 313
G.16 B.490 MM.111 EMLA
B.10 G.202 P.18
G.214 G.11 Seedling
G.41 G.210
G.65 G.30
G.935 G.890
M.27 G.969
M.9 J-TE-H
Mark M.4
Ottawa 3 M.27, M.9 (interstem)/
MM.106 rootstock
P.2 M.27,M.9(interstem)/
MM.111 rootstock
P.22 M.26
Supporter 1 M.7 EMLA
Supporter 4 MM.106 EMLA
V.3 V.1

Understanding Apple Tree Size: Dwarf, Semi-Dwarf and Standard

Apple rootstocks have traditionally been divided into three groups: standard, semi-dwarf, and dwarf.

A standard size tree refers to trees growing on seedling rootstock. If trees on seedling rootstocks are not pruned to limit tree size, the trees will reach a height of about 30 feet and have a crown diameter of about 30 feet. Orchards planted before the 1960s often had only 40 trees per acre and were spaced 40 feet by 40 feet. With good pruning, standard size …

Where do I purchase stakes for apple trees?

The tree stake desired and the number required will determine where you purchase your tree stakes. If using a conduit stake in a limited number, you can purchase from a local general hardware or do-it-yourself warehouse. For larger quantities of conduit, you can usually get a volume discount purchasing from an electrical supplier. Also, specialized metal tree stakes can be purchased and shipped as well. A Web search for “orchard tree stakes” will give you several to select from. However, …

Do I have to stake all trees on all rootstocks?

No, you do not have to stake all trees. Generally, since we do not have commercialized dwarfing rootstocks for most stone fruits, these trees do not need to be staked. Apples are the primary tree fruit crop that needs to be staked, but not all rootstocks need to be staked; however, all trees benefit in their early life from staking to prevent wind whipping and leaning. The more size-controlling the rootstock, the greater the need to stake the tree. Trees …